Monday, June 27, 2011

Patricia T. Clough: What Cultural Studies did to Marxism. March 19, 1998.

What Cultural Studies did to Marxism.

Patricia T. Clough, author of The End(s) of Ethnography and Auto-Affection: Unconscious Thought in the Age of Teletechnology gave a series of talks in the Spring of 1998 as the Scholar in Residence. The video of the event has been lost, but the audio tapes have been preserved. "What Cultural Studies did to Marxism" is the second talk in the series and was given on March 19, 1998.


Patricia T. Clough, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for the Study of Women and Society, City University of New York Graduate Center.  She was the Department of Social Science & Cultural Studies  Scholar in Residence in Spring 1998, Pratt Institute.
Her first talk in the series, "Psychoanalysis, Autoaffection, & Tele-technology," presented on February 19, 1998 can be heard here:
http://www.archive.org/details/PatricaT.CloughPsychoanalysisAutoaffectionTele-technologyFebruary19



Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Patricia T. Clough: Psychoanalysis, Autoaffection & Tele-technology



Patricia T. Clough of the CUNY Graduate Center and author of The End(s) of Ethnography and Auto-Affection: Unconscious Thought in the Age of Teletechnology gave a series of talks in the Spring of 1998 as the Scholar in Residence. The video of the event has been lost, but the audio tapes have been preserved. This is part one of her talk on February 19, 1998. 48:29)




"But to suggest, as I am, that cultural critics have been drawn by tele-technology to give thought over to a future that they themselves have not always fully grasped is to propose that thought is not given by individual thinkers so much as it is given to them as they are drawn to the future by it....By teletechnology I mean to refer to the realization of technoscience, technoculture, and technocature --- that is, to the full interface of computer technology and television, promising global networks of information and communication whereby layers of electronic images, texts, and sounds flow in real time, so that the speeds of the territorialization deterritorialization, and reterritorialization of social spaces, as well as the adjustment to the vulnerabilities of exposure to media event-ness, are beyond any users mere decision to turn 'it' on or off."

PART TWO

Patricia T. Clough, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for the Study of Women and Society, City University of New York Graduate Center.  She was the Department of Social Science & Cultural Studies  Scholar in Residence in Spring 1998, Pratt Institute.


Stanley Aronowitz: On the Origins of Cultural Studies (1998)

Stanley Aronowitz, Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center and one of the important figures in the rise of Cultural Studies in the United States, held a series of talks with the faculty during the Fall of 1998. This is a video of his first talk in which he describes the origins of Cultural Studies, its reception in the United States during the 1980s and 1990s, the founding of the Center for Cultural Studies at CUNY and now Center for Work, Technology & Culture, the key role of study groups, and the risks in the acceptance of Cultural Studies by American academia.

Stanley Aronowitz --- On the Origins of Cultural Studies

Faculty Seminar, Department of Social Science & Cultural Studies, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences,
Pratt Institute, 1998.
To be sure, there is no doubt that the development of cultural studies has been influenced by both the impetus to depart from traditional disciplinary demarcations and, especially recently, by the imperative of institutionalization that is perceived by proponents of cultural studies to oblige them to integrate themselves more securely within the disciplines, specifically the humanities.  And, particularly in English and, to a lesser degree, comparative literature, cultural studies tends to become a weapon in internecine wars, especially of those who wish to practice studies of popular culture and what has been described as 'theory.'  Of course, these confinements subvert the whole project of cultural studies, which, as I will argue, seeks to transgress the boundaries between humanities and the sciences, and even to transcend the boundaries of formal academic sites.  At its best, cultural studies is not interdisciplinary; it is anti-disciplinary. --- Aronowitz, Roll Over Beethoven: The Return of Cultural Strife, p. 7-8.